HiSET
Everything
You Need To Know

Check out our free resources to get started on your journey to passing the HiSET

HiSET
Everything
You Need To Know

Check out our free resources to get started on your journey to passing the HiSET

Get a free HiSET Practice Test

Free HiSET Study Resources

Free HiSET Practice Test

Take a free HiSET practice test to gauge your strengths and weaknesses. 

#1 Strategy You Need To Pass the HiSET

The secrets to passing the HiSET without cramming and memorizing. 

Free HiSET Study Group

Daily HiSET practice test questions and students just like you. 

Test Your Knowledge With These Practice Test Questions

FAQ: Have questions about the HiSET?
We have answers

Check out some of the most frequently asked questions from our students

The HiSET is a nationally recognized exam that is equivalent to a high school diploma. The HiSET measures test-takers skills and knowledge of a high school graduate. Having the equivalent of a high school diploma allows for students to have access to better career opportunities and access to furthering their education.

The HiSET stands for High School Equivalency Test.

There are 5 sections on the HiSET including writing, language arts, math, social studies, and science. The test has 240 questions.

Writing – 50 Multiple Choice Questions and Essay 120 Minutes

Reading – 40 Multiple Choice Questions – 60 Minutes

Math – 50 Multiple Choice Questions, 90 Minutes

Social Studies – 50 Multiple Choice Questions, 70 Minutes

Science – 50 Multiple Choice Questions, 80 Minutes

Eligibility to take the HiSET varies from state to state. You do not need to be a U.S Citizen to take the HiSET. Some states require test-takers to be at least a certain age which can vary from 16-18 years old. In addition, some states require a number of high school credits or adult education instruction prior to taking the HiSET.

To see what the requirements are in your state or territories, visit
https://hiset.ets.org/requirements/state

Both the HiSET and GED are high school equivalent and nationally recognized tests in all 50 states by colleges and employers. The main difference between the HiSET and the GED is that the HiSET has 5 test sections, whereas the GED has 4 test sections. The HiSET offers a computer and paper version of the test, the GED only offers a computer version of the test.

There are 5 sections on the HiSET including writing, language arts, math, social studies, and science. The test has 240 questions.

Writing – 50 Multiple Choice Questions and Essay 120 Minutes

Reading – 40 Multiple Choice Questions – 60 Minutes

Math – 50 Multiple Choice Questions, 90 Minutes

Social Studies – 50 Multiple Choice Questions, 70 Minutes

Science – 50 Multiple Choice Questions, 80 Minutes

The essay portion of the writing section of the test is 45 minutes. Not every essay has the same writing prompt. Common prompts include:

– Read two passages with different opinions about the same topic. You will have to review the passages and evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of each. This will require you to also include your own argument with supportive details while referencing directly back to the original passages.

– Evaluate a quote about a topic and provide a written response explaining the quote, what it means, and if you agree or disagree with it while providing examples.

– Write a letter of support or writing in opposition about a topic in a structured essay focusing on tone, diction, and evaluating the argument.

The essays are scored on how the ideas are developed and communicate. A well-written essay should be written in the standard format with an introduction paragraph, 3 supportive paragraphs, and a conclusion paragraph. The essay will also be scored based on proper grammar, transitions, spelling, cohesion, punctuation, and vocabulary usage.

 

The testing fee for each section of the test is $15 for the paper test and $10.75 for the computer-administered test. However, some states may charge additional fees. Always check with the local testing center for any additional fees.

Once you’ve determined that the HiSET is the state-issued high school equivalency that you want to take, you need to create an account on the HiSET website. https://hiset.ets.org/requirements/hiset-account/

Once you create a HiSET account, you’ll be able to find a testing center, schedule your test, pay for the test, view your scores, and print your scores. Once you schedule your test, you’ll be given direction on accessing your paper or computer test on your testing day.

You can take a part of the test (a sub-section) up to 3 times a year, the first attempt is the initial test with two additional retakes per section.

The HiSET uses a scaled score system. Most states use the HiSET criteria to evaluate if a test-taker passed or did not pass the HiSET. The requirements are:

1. Score at least 8 out of 20 on each of the five sections.

2. Score at least 2 out of 6 on the essay.

3. Earn a minimum of 45 out of 100 as a total scaled score.

Something to be aware of is that an 8 out of 20 does not mean you only have to get 8 questions correct. The scaled score system identifies certain questions harder than others and uses a common scale to weigh each question. If your test has more easy questions, you’ll need more correct to earn at least an 8. Whereas if your version of the test comprises of harder questions, you won’t need to get as many right to earn at least an 8.

Studying for the HiSET can be overwhelming. The easiest way to determine a starting point with studying is by identifying your strengths and weaknesses. By taking a free HiSET practice test, you can get a feel for the test and see your individual diagnostic report by each section.

After reviewing your results, start studying the topics and lessons where you scored the lowest.

We recommend using a credible HiSET prep course instead of trying to piece together information from the internet. Quizlets, Youtubers, and Google shouldn’t be your only references for studying. A prep course is made by editors, teachers, tutors, and scholars who take the test and create realistic questions and organized lessons.

Yes. Employers and colleges in all 50 states accept the HiSET.